Carlisle council OKs surveillance camera project

State-of-the-art video surveillance cameras will be up and running in part of Carlisle by spring.

Borough council approved a project Wednesday night for five surveillance cameras and eight radio antennas in the Memorial Park area.

Police officers will be able to view the live footage at the police station and in patrol cars via a wireless feed, said Lt. Michael Dzezinski of the Carlisle Police Department.

The system will be installed in two to three months, he added. The cameras won’t impede on residents’ rights to privacy, officials have said, and will only monitor public areas.

A motion made by Councilman Tim Scott to enter into a contract with Iron Sky, a Texas-based security company that will handle the work, passed 7-0 with no comments from council members.

After the meeting, Councilwoman Linda Cecconello said the system will help alleviate the workload placed on officers. The system, she continued, will allow officers to have eyes in the Memorial Park area 24 hours a day, seven days a week without actually having to be there the entire time.

“I think it’ll be great,” she said of the cameras. “(It) gives everybody a form of safety in the community.”

Downtown cameras

Funding for the project, not to exceed $73,245.41, will come from Carlisle’s Community Development Block Grant. That cost will also include the required server, software, peripheral equipment, IT work and installation.

Memorial Park is located between North Pitt and North West streets and abuts West Penn Street to the south and a railroad line to the north.

The nonprofit community organization Hope Station is headquartered in a former train station within park boundaries.

The borough had previously received $200,000 in federal funding for a downtown surveillance system. Ten cameras are expected to be in place as part of that system sometime in the future.

Downtown was the selected location because of grant stipulations.

During the meeting, council approved license agreements between the borough and Cumberland County, Carlisle Housing Opportunity Homes, Inc. and Jamie Wolfe, a borough business owner, as part of that system.

Those agreements are needed, Dzezinski said, to mount equipment on properties owned by the county, the housing organization and Wolfe for the downtown system.

LERTA

Council also approved a Local Economic Revitalization Tax Assistance Act (LERTA) during the meeting with a 7-0 vote.

LERTA can be used to encourage a property owner to fix up a commercial or mixed-use property in the downtown. They would see gradual increases in property taxes over five years once the property is reassessed because of the improvements, rather than seeing a large jump in taxes. By the sixth year, the developer would pay the full amount of taxes under the reassessed price.

The borough recoups the lost taxes in about four years, said Susan Armstrong, assistant borough manager. LERTA was first adopted in 2000 and was renewed in 2005. The act must be renewed every five years.

In October, the Carlisle Area School District school board approved the LERTA program through November 2015.

Cumberland County is also expected to approve their LERTA program in the near future. The borough, school district and county are the three affected taxing bodies.


Posted at 8:34 p.m. Wednesday on Cumberlink:Carlisle council approved tonight a project to install five video surveillance cameras in the Memorial Park area of the borough.

The cameras will be up and running in two to three months, said Lt. Michael Dzezinski of the Carlisle Police Department.

A motion made by Councilman Tim Scott to approve the project passed 7-0.

Under the proposal, five video surveillance cameras and eight radio antennas would be installed. The cameras won’t impede on anyone’s right to privacy, officials said.

Funding for the project, not to exceed $73,245.41, will come from Carlisle’s Community Development Block Grant. That cost will also include the required server, software, peripheral equipment, IT work and installation.

For more of this story, check out Thursday’s edition of The Sentinel.

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